AS GOOD AS DEAD: INTERVIEW WITH SCOTT LUCAS

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SCOTT LUCAS

Ever since I can remember, I always was consumed with the thought – what is it like being the real rock-n-roll star ? A hard work of coping with crowds of groupies and destroying bumps with the power of hard-working German vacuum cleaner. And with it – seeing things through the prism of different reality. This minds have occupied my head since I was a teenager wearing ripped jeans and played Nirvana’s cover-songs. But still, the time has passed. My views to the music with it’s personalities changed. Gene Simmons wouldn’t seem such an innovator in musical world. This pride of place was given to Henry Rollins and Sonic Youth. But anyway, my thoughts about being a rock-star didn’t changed.

Guy Ritchie showed to the world the nature of a real rock star – philosopher hooped up on crack. Perhaps on the one hand it’s true. But on another – it’s very differs with Scott Lucas. Starting a band with his school friend the musician gradually become one of rising stars of forming alternative music. More than twenty years have passed. But still, not much changed. That still play concerts with sold-out and greedy listening and calling for traditional encore, public.

In his talk, Scott Lucas is simple and uncomplicated. I’m listening his answers with maximum attention, tasting the each word trying to understand – what was the music at that time ? With this question I’m thinking about – could I understand him ? The man who had played at that place, and at that time. The man who opened up performances of Stone Temple Pilots and other legends left the scene at the period of  90’s. With it became the part of this unique bygone era.

Largely their songs had become apologists of the very bygone era. The Era which with this continues life at Local H’s concerts – when the time stops and all the audience sank into the wave calling “grunge”.

Answering the questions of  “Young Space” magazine, the vocalist of  Local H – Scott Lucas have told us about today’s situation with the band, about searching of their unique style in the 90’s and about process of recording of band’s culd album – “As good as Dead”.


— I would like to start an interview with such a standard question: Can you
tell me please, how your tour is going on? What are your feelings?

— The tour’s going great. It was a long one. It’s almost over, but we’ve had
a lot of great shows.

— The style in which you play is usually called «post-grunge». What do you
think,whether is post-grunge exist or it’s just a piece of phrase by some
journalist which was taken out of the context?

— I always thought we played “rock”. I prefer to stick with that. I’d rather not
get too boxed in. That’d be boring.

-In fact, after the death of Kurt Cobain, all grunge groups became an
«alternative», and the style itself — ended as a stage in a person’s life. Do you
miss the grunge? How do you remember this time?

— I don’t think about it too much. I’ve noticed an interest in the music and
even the term in Russia — but it’s not something we think about very much.

-Continuing the grunge theme — many people in the standard form ask
questions in the interview like «Which concert changed your life?» … Well,
was there such a concert you could not get to, but which could change you?

— I have NO idea. How would anyone know that?

-Your first mini-album was released in 1991, which was followed by the
first full-length «Ham Fisted» — stylistic differences are very strong. What
gave such a result? Was this work with the producer or the result of
cooperation with a major label?

-Nah. We spent a few years trying to figure out who we were and getting
comfortable with ourselves. Ham Fisted wasn’t recorded until 1994. I’m
glad we had a few years where no one was watching so we could get our shit
together.

-A question that can not be asked – Local H have become famous because
of your unique guitar sound. Tell me – where did the idea come from to use
the bass pickups at the electric guitar?

— We didn’t know many bass players. After our first one quit, we never
bothered to replace him. We just kept recording. When we were forced to
play shows we had to figure out a way to make up for the lack of bass. A
way to make it heavy. The bass pick up was our solution.

-After your first album, there was a breakthrough, which was «As Good as
Dead». Tell me, what is the most pleasant memory associated with you with
that era? Maybe it’s work in the studio over the album or shooting a clip for
the song «Bound For The Floor» or the first concert of the tour?

— Just the feeling of knowing we had some breathing room. A small bit of
clout to keep making the records we wanted to make. We got to tour a lot
and the shows were great. Not much has changed.

-Your visit to Russia ended quite unpleasantly — robbery and a ligament
injury. How is your health now? Are you planning to return again with a
tour?

— I’m fine. No plans to return, but it’s certainly not because of that incident. I
bear no ill will over that. I’m much more concerned about Putin’s
involvement in helping Trump get elected. Now THAT fucking sucks!

-You and Ryan worked on the album «Hey, Killer» for the first time. What
was the begin work with new members? Did you quickly find a commonlanguage?

-We’d known each other for a while. It was very easy. We decided to tour
before we did any recording so we could build up some chemistry.

-Someone approaches to writing songs like William S. Burroughs — writes
tracts, then cuts them into pieces and adds a mosaic. Someone like Goya can
only write at night. What approach do you have?

— I just keep my ears open. Take stuff in. Try to figure out what I want to say.

— Now people are talking about the fact that «As Good as Dead» largely
determined the sound of the 90’s — not as large as «Nevermind», but still.
What is your reaction to this statement?

— Surprise…It’s totally not true, by the way.

— What is the key to a successful concert? Is there any constant formula,
or just do as the heart commands?

— Very show is different. You just gotta read the room and try to get people onyour side.

— Children appear in your most famous clip. That’s why I would like to
link the last question with the children. Suppose you would have the
opportunity to compose a playlist for these very children of their clip — what
they could listen to the entire decade and the subsequent life, remembering
only the good moments of their life. Which songs would you include ?


 Cheap Trick — Surrender

Nirvana — Sliver

 Led Zeppelin — When The Levee Breaks

Motorhead — We Are The Road Crew 

 Misfits- Attitude 

 Tom Petty — I Need To Know 

  Metallica — Master Of Puppets 

Naked Raygun — Rat Patrol

Harry Nillson — You’re Breakin’ My Heart


Russian version of the Interview